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Book review: “The Netanyahus: An Account of a Minor and Ultimately Even Negligible Episode in the History of a Very Famous Family” by Joshua Cohen
Joshua Cohen’s novel The Netanyahus: An Account of a Minor and Ultimately Even Negligible Episode in the History of a Very Famous Family won the 2022 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction with the judges hailing it as “a mordant, linguistically deft historical novel about the ambiguities of the Jewish-American experience, presenting ideas and disputes as volatile as its tightly-wound plot.” I disagree. But what do I know? Colm Tóibín, the Irish novelist and essayist, wrote, “The Netanyahus is constructed with a…
Book review: “The Female Man” by Joanna Russ
Nearly half a century ago, Joanna Russ published The Female Man, a creative, passionate and prescient science fiction novel, as a commentary on the constrained lives of women in human society. It is a novel filled with bitter humor and spiky insights that focuses on four women, existing in alternate realities, who meet and become companions of a sort: Jeannine Dadier, a timid, hesitant 29-year-old woman living on an Earth where, in 1969, the Depression is still a daily fact.…
Book review: “The Guns of Rio Conchos” by Clair Huffaker
After a stint as an assistant editor in the Time magazine Chicago bureau, Clair Huffaker began his book-writing career, publishing one novelization of a movie (Cowboy) and eight short western novels of his own between 1957 and 1959. That’s a lot of writing or, at least, a lot of publishing in a short amount of time. But then, Huffaker in his early 30s slowed down, producing just five more books between 1963 and 1976, none of them genre westerns.  The…